Sign In
  • UD Search

Implicit Bias Awareness Week - archival page

Image Picker for Section 0
Featured Event - April 10

April 10, 2017 - 4:00pm to 6:30 pm, Gore Recital Hall, Roselle Center for the Arts

​2017 Distinguished Lecture on Diversity Unconscious and Implicit bias

Anthony Greenwald, Professor of Psychology, University of Washington

Free public lecture on "The Selling of Implicit Bias" in Gore Recital Hall with book signing and reception to follow in the CFA Atrium. RSVP requested due to limited space.

The concept of implicit bias is being sold both by psychologists bringing applications to public attention and by commercial interests offering to cure the damages implicit biases can cause. A byproduct of any scientific work being propagated beyond its originating disciplines is that non-experts will generate pseudo-knowledge that lacks solid empirical roots. This talk describes both what is solidly established empirically and misconceptions that are best dispelled.

Event presented by the Center for the Study of Diversity with support from the College of Arts & Sciences, the Office of the President, the Office of the Provost, the College of Earth, Ocean & Environment, Alfred Lerner College of Business & Economics, the College of Education & Human Development, the College of Agriculture & Natural Resources, UD ADVANCE, the Office of Equity & Inclusion, Professional & Continuing Studies, and University of Delaware Police.

If you attended any of the public events, please take this survey that will extend our discussion on Implicit and Unintentional Bias.

Week-long focus on Implicit Bias

During the week of April 10 - 14 and beyond, the Center for the Study of Diversity partnered with the Colleges and other units to spotlight the impact of Implicit Bias on the campus climate.

The UD Library has compiled a list of resources relevant to implicit bias available here.

For anyone interested in taking the Implicit Association Test, it is accessible here and is free of charge. Choose among the following variations of the IAT:

  • Asian American ('Asian - European American' IAT). This IAT requires the ability to recognize White and Asian-American faces, and images of places that are either American or Foreign in origin.
  • Race ('Black - White' IAT). This IAT requires the ability to distinguish faces of European and African origin. It indicates that most Americans have an automatic preference for white over black.
  • Gender - Career. This IAT often reveals a relative link between family and females and between career and males.
  • Skin-tone ('Light Skin - Dark Skin' IAT). This IAT requires the ability to recognize light and dark-skinned faces. It often reveals an automatic preference for light-skin relative to dark-skin.
  • Disability ('Disabled - Abled' IAT). This IAT requires the ability to recognize symbols representing abled and disabled individuals.
  • Weight ('Fat - Thin' IAT). This IAT requires the ability to distinguish faces of people who are obese and people who are thin. It often reveals an automatic preference for thin people relative to fat people.
  • Gender - Science. This IAT often reveals a relative link between liberal arts and females and between science and males.
  • Native American ('Native - White American' IAT). This IAT requires the ability to recognize White and Native American faces in either classic or modern dress, and the names of places that are either American or Foreign in origin.
  • Arab-Muslim ('Arab Muslim - Other People' IAT). This IAT requires the ability to distinguish names that are likely to belong to Arab-Muslims versus people of other nationalities or religions.
  • Weapons ('Weapons - Harmless Objects' IAT). This IAT requires the ability to recognize White and Black faces, and images of weapons or harmless objects.
  • Age ('Young - Old' IAT). This IAT requires the ability to distinguish old from young faces. This test often indicates that Americans have automatic preference for young over old.
  • Sexuality ('Gay - Straight' IAT). This IAT requires the ability to distinguish words and symbols representing gay and straight people. It often reveals an automatic preference for straight relative to gay people.

Private Events

In addition to public events, closed events were held this week to learn about implicit bias and how to overcome the institutional challenges it poses. These included:

  • Meeting between Dr. Tony Greenwald and President Dennis Assanis and his Executive Council
  • Luncheon for Dr. Tony Greenwald hosted by the UD Police Department
Office of Equity and Inclusion events

"Unintentional Bias: The Context of Discrimination"

Employee workshops analyze the subtle ways that racial, ethnic, gender and sex biases inhibit a positive and inclusive campus environment. The training provides participants with strategies on increasing awareness of microaggressions and how to mitigate the effects of unintentional biases.

Learn more at http://www1.udel.edu/cpa/html-email/oei_workshops/

Alfred Lerner College of Business & Economics event

"Becoming Conscious of Unconscious Bias"

Lunch and learn event with a Latin Flavors buffet. Participants took the Implicit Association test prior to the session, which was moderated by Dr. Wendy Smith. 


Closing Event

Continuing the Work: Unintentional Bias

We wrapped up the week with review and path forward. The work is only beginning, and this is an opportunity to reflect on what we’ve learned, explore how it applies to our personal and professional lives, and how we can take steps to combat implicit bias. This session included a guided facilitation by Jennifer Daniels and Adam Foley (Office of Equity & Inclusion) and participants left with their own to-do items moving forward! Sponsored by the Center for the Study of Diversity and facilitated with the Office of Equity and Inclusion.


Employee Development classes

​Valuing Diversity and Differences for Positive Results, April 14, 10:00 am - 11:30 am, 111 Memorial Hall

Applying the content of this course will enable learners to:

  • understand how the personal experiences and circumstances of individuals shape their unintentional biases and “blind spots” in how they communicate with others.
  • work more collaboratively and productively with others to achieve better results.
  • create a welcoming and inclusive environment in which diversity and differences are respected and utilized for the success of all.
  • encourage team members to contribute their unique styles, abilities, and motivations to their work and to their working relationships.

Students should register for this class by using this Form

Keys to Intercultural Communication, April 12, 10:00 am - noon, 209 Trabant University Center

Designed to assist departments with unifying individuals from diverse backgrounds and cultures, this workshop will look at individual and collective cultural differences and the impacts these differences can have on values, beliefs, and day-to-day work interactions. Emphasis will be placed on creating positive and collaborative work relationships. Register at ConnectingU for full-time employees; others register by calling OEI at 302-831-8063.

Dialogues on Diversity, April 14, 10:00 am - noon, Collins Room, Perkins Student Center

Learn about the "-isms" (racism, sexism, ableism, homophobia/heterosexism, classism, body-shaming) and the way in which we discuss them. You will have an opportunity to explore aspects of your own identity and how to better engage in often difficult dialogues around issues of oppression, while also discovering a sense of empowerment. Register at ConnectingU for full-time employees; others register by calling OEI at 302-831-8063.

Students should register for this class by using this Form

UD ADVANCE and CTAL

Interactive lunch & learn for faculty on implicit bias in student evaluations of teaching, Thursday, April 13, 12:30-1:30 pm, 102B Pearson Hall

Rose Muravchick (Assistant Director, CTAL) to lead discussion.

Information on bias in Student Evaluations of Teaching (SETs) followed by a discussion on the implications for P&T and how we can work to mitigate against some of these biases in our classrooms. This is a faculty-only event. Limited space; please RSVP here.

Professional & Continuing Studies Event

Lunch and Learn, April 12, 12:30 pm

"Implicit Bias" Lunch and Learn Workshop, midday with pizza, soda, and salad. Presented by Adam Foley and Jennifer Daniels of the Office of Equity and Inclusion. The lunch and learn will be held at 501 South College Avenue, Newark, in either room 155A or the Conference Room.

Page Settings and MetaData:
(Not Shown on the Page)
Page Settings
Implicit Bias Awareness Week
No
MetaData for Search Engine Optimization
Implicit Bias Awareness Week - archival page
  • Center for the Study of Diversity
  • 309 McKinly Lab
  • University of Delaware
  • Newark, DE 19716, USA
  • Phone: 302-831-3033
  • lschulz@udel.edu